Kodiak Bones & Bugs Taxidermy

Specializing in quality dermestid beetles

Author: Taxidermy (page 2 of 2)

Which Dermestid Beetles Are the Right Ones to Purchase?

Take care of your beetle colony, and they will eat meat down to the bone. It sounds simple, but the truth is, some beetles are better than others. When it comes to taxidermy, dermestid beetles are the preferred choice, but did you know there are different types?

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How to Make the Best Dermestid Beetle Enclosure

Whether you’re a taxidermist who needs clean skulls, a hunter looking for a fresh trophy, or an artist or museum curator, dermestid beetles are efficient and thorough. These beetles used for taxidermy clean skulls and prevent damage from boiling or chemicals. You’ll need anywhere from a few hundred to thousands of beetles. To maintain a large colony, you need the conditions for beetles to thrive throughout their life cycle.

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How Do You Care for Dermestid Beetles?

Dermestid beetles are often used in taxidermy, as their larvae are efficient scavengers that feed on dead tissue until there’s nothing left but bone. Yet buying bugs for sale and letting these critters run free isn’t going to yield the desired results. Colonies need proper care to thrive. You’ll need a minimum of 300 beetles to get started, and 1,000 to 5,000 to achieve skull cleaning for specimens such as deer or bear.1

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How Many Beetles Do I Need for Skull Cleaning?

Flesh-eating beetles, or dermestids, are harmless creatures that eat flesh off animal carcasses, including those of humans. The larvae of dermestid beetles feed continuously until all that’s left is bone. This process is known as skeletonization and is often used by taxidermists, museum curators, and law enforcement to aid forensic work—the bugs can clear bones of flesh to expose evidence, which can be destroyed by harsh chemicals. Better yet, you can find bugs for sale via providers such as Kodiak Bones & Bugs Taxidermy!

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Why Use Dermestid Beetles

Taxidermists have a few options when it comes to preserving the bones of animal specimens. A few can be rather harsh, such as chemical treatments (i.e., tanning) and boiling, but skeletonization can be achieved in an easier, more natural way—with dermestid beetles.

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What Is Skull Cleaning?

Skull cleaning is a process in which the skull of a hunted or trapped animal, or one that has expired due to natural causes, is prepared for display. It is an important step in taxidermy. However, it can be time-consuming, messy, and unpleasant, depending on the method used. Some insects naturally eat the flesh of dead animals, simplifying the process. They can be easily acquired by ordering bugs for sale at Kodiak Bones & Bugs Taxidermy.

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Which Bones Are Viable for Taxidermy?

Mounted figures and skulls of birds, small mammals, and large game represent the art of taxidermy, or the preparing, stuffing, and mounting of skins of animals. Records of the practice date back to the 16th century. The art form has survived into the modern day to serve many different purposes. Some taxidermists prefer the skin and fur intact; others aim to prepare complete skulls, which our dermestid beetles for sale at Kodiak Bones & Bugs Taxidermy can provide.

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